Open Access

Transformation at the Heart Level

· Dharma Discourses, Open Access · ,

by Konrad Ryushin Marchaj, Sensei

Dhritaka
Transmission of the Light, Case 6

Main Case
The fifth ancestor, Dhritaka, said, “Because one who makes his home departure is a selfless Self, is selfless and possesses nothing, and because the Mind neither arises nor ceases, this is the eternal Way. All Buddhas are also eternal. The mind has no form and its essence is the same.” Upagupta said,“You must become thoroughly awakened and realize it with your own mind.” Dhritaka was greatly awakened.

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Sangha Reflections: On Patience

· Open Access, Sangha Reflections · ,

IN NOVEMBER 2005, I suffered a sore throat. Being a storyteller, I attributed it to Halloween overwork. No. A vocal cord was paralyzed. The doctor told me to stop talking for six weeks in case it might recover.

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Photo by Moose Winas

Your Mountain Form Finds its Seat

· Dharma Discourses, Open Access · ,

by Geoffrey Shugen Arnold, Sensei

from Master Dogen’s Fukanzazengi

The way is originally perfect and all pervading. How could it be contingent upon practice and realization? The true vehicle is selfsufficient. What need is there for special effort? Indeed, the whole body is free from dust. Who could believe in a means to brush it clean? It is never apart from this very place; what is the use of traveling around to practice? And yet, if there is a hairsbreadth deviation, it is like the gap between heaven and earth. If the least like or dislike arises, the mind is lost in confusion.

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Sangha Reflections: On Wildness

· Open Access, Sangha Reflections · ,

AS A KID I TRIED TO IMAGINE the rural landscapes around me without telephone poles and electric wires—how the rivers and hills might have looked to the Native Americans or the first European settlers or the deer and raccoons. Even then I was yearning for wilderness and an unobstructed aliveness.

Drawn to Buddhism through Daido Roshi’s teachings of sacred wild, it wasn’t enlightenment I was seeking so much as a fuller, more awake intimacy with the natural world and myself within it.

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Photo by Chris Webster

Meeting Machig Labdron

· Articles & Essays, Open Access · ,

by Jody Hojin Kimmel Osho

Right now you have the opportunity.
Look for the essence of mind—this is meaningful.
When you look at mind, there is nothing to be seen.
In this very not-seeing, you see the definitive meaning.

—Machig Labdron

A few years ago I was leafing through a magazine and came eye-to-eye with a young Tibetan woman, an infant swaddled to her back.

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Photo by Art Terry

Natural, Vivid, Alive

· Dharma Discourses, Open Access · ,

by Geoffrey Shugen Arnold, Sensei

Ordinary Mind is Tao
Gateless Gate, Case 19

Main Case
Chao-chou once asked Nanchuan, “What is Tao?” Nanchuan answered, “Ordinary mind is Tao.” “Then should we direct ourselves toward it or not?” asked Chao-chou. “If you try to direct yourself toward it, you go away from it,” answered Nanchuan. Chao-chou continued, “If we do not try, how can we know that it is Tao?” Nanchuan replied, “Tao does not belong to knowing or not-knowing. Knowing is illusion; not-knowing is blankness. If you really attain to Tao of no-doubt, it is like the great void, so vast and boundless. How, then, can there be right and wrong in the Tao?” At these words Chao-chou was suddenly enlightened.

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Photo by Rob Wyatt

The Unexpected Rears Its Head

· Dharma Discourses, Open Access · ,

by Konrad Ryushin Marchaj, Sensei

Yangshan’s Declaration
Book of Serenity, Case 90

Introduction
‘I alone am sober’—this is drunkenness indeed. Yangshan speaks of a dream just like when awake. But say, as I say this and you hear it, tell me, is this wakefulness or is this a dream?

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Photo by Ricardo Sanz Cortiella

Transmigrating, For Now

· Dharma Discourses, Open Access · ,

by Konrad Ryushin Marchaj, Sensei

Ruiyan’s “Constant Principle”
Book of Serenity, Case 75

Introduction
Even as you call it ‘thus,’ it’s already changed. Where knowledge doesn’t reach, avoid speaking of it. Here, is there any investigating or not? 

Case
Ruiyan asked Yantou, “What is the fundamental constant principle?”
Yantou said, “Moving.”
Ruiyan said, “When moving, what then?”
Yantou said, “You don’t see the fundamental constant principle.”
Ruiyan stood there thinking.
Yantou said, “If you agree, you are not yet free of sense and matter: if you don’t agree, you’ll be forever sunk in birth and death.” 

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Photo by David R. Harper

The Original Question

· Dharma Discourses, Open Access · ,

by Geoffrey Shugen Arnold, Sensei

Zhao Zhou’s “Indestructible Nature”
True Dharma Eye, Case 288

Main Case
Zhao Zhou was once asked by a monastic, “Before the world existed, there was already the original nature. When the world is destroyed, true nature is not destroyed. What is this indestructible nature?”

Zhao Zhou said, “Four great elements and five skandhas.”

The monastic said, “They are destroyed. What is this indestructible nature?”

Zhao Zhou said, “Four great elements and five skandhas.”

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Sangha Reflections: On Rebirth

· Open Access, Sangha Reflections · ,

THIRTY-FIVE YEARS AGO, as a graduate student at Columbia University, I studied with Yoshito Hakeda, Professor of Religion and a Shingon priest. We worked one-on-one studying Buddhist texts. He was not only my teacher, but also my mentor and my friend.

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