Sangha News

Reflections on Temple Resident Life Under Quarantine

· Essays, Reflections, Sangha News

Residency at our Brooklyn Temple has always been an interweaving of NYC energy with the Zen Buddhism of a lay practice center. In these early weeks of the pandemic, our current residents Oliver, Jo and Brian, have shifted gears from their personal and Temple related routines. Here they offer an inside view of their lives and Zen training, greatly changed and yet in important ways still very much the same. — MR

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Digital Refuge in the MRO

· Sangha News, Zen Training

By Eve Romm

Until two weeks ago, joining the residents for zazen meant hurriedly finishing the dinner dishes, throwing on my coat and heading down the road to the Monastery. Opening the front door, I would be greeted by the smell of incense and the wooden dragon’s arresting gaze before finding an empty seat in the zendo.

These days, sitting with the sangha has a very different routine. As 7:30 pm approaches, I along with practitioners living down the road or as far away as New Zealand will make room on our altars for a laptop and open the Monastery livestream, where gray-robed residents filter in and take their seats to the familiar rhythm of the timekeeper’s han run. This week, more than a hundred people are participating in “virtual sesshin” from their own homes, committing to four hours of zazen per day, periods of mindful eating and work practice, and limited contact with email and the news.

Rakusan offers a senior’s talk, livestreamed to my increasingly crowded home altar.

Strange as it is to have my laptop and Internet connection suddenly become a central part of my meditation practice, it’s surprisingly powerful to be able to see and hear the zendo. Particularly poignant are the small, ordinary sights and sounds: the familiar rustling of robes and crackling of radiators, the straightening of zabutons after service, and whispered conferences about the subtleties of service positions. Shugen Roshi recently made a small but telling change in the liturgy: instead of bowing towards the center of the room as part of the formal exit, the monastics and residents now turn and bow towards the back of the zendo, where the livestream camera is mounted. This subtle shift makes me feel intimately included in zendo practice, even at a distance.

Not all of our digital community happens in silence, though. Everything from Zen Kids meetings to art practice sessions to conversations with teachers and monastics has been moved online, so almost every day there is an opportunity to see the faces of the sangha. As much as I miss the physical presence of the community within the monastery building, there is an unexpected silver lining to this time of distancing—the ability to be in closer contact with the many practitioners who live too far away to come to the Monastery regularly. On many of the Zoom meetings, there are faces I’ve never seen, or see infrequently—the New Zealand sangha gathered in their zendo, students living overseas, old friends of the Monastery who have moved away, and many others.

Some of the many faces at a recent meeting with Shugen Roshi via Zoom.

In addition to the generous virtual offerings coming from the Monastery cloister, the lay sangha has found a number of other ways to use the digital tools available to nourish practice in this time of uncertainty. Seigei Spark and Sankai Lemmens, both senior lay practitioners, started a “Sangha Treasure” google group, a platform for sharing photos and staying connected. Shea Zuiko Settimi and Mary Bosakowski, who share a house in Phoenicia, host a Zoom meeting every night at 8 PM to check in, chant the Metta Sutta, and offer dedications or intentions.

Regarding this daily moment of connection, Mary writes: “It’s so warming, so enriching, so tender for us to spend this time and explore this teaching, together. And, afterwards, to go around the circle and offer our personal dedications. We have members of our own sangha, other sanghas, as well as friends who, while they may not identify as Buddhists, join in whole-heartedly. We may be few, or more than a few, on any given night, but each and every night has its own power and grace. I’m grateful for this time together. Grounded by it. In awe of it.”

These new digital tools have great potential, but also present some challenges. It’s hard to maintain a mental cloister when the same screen that houses my virtual zendo also offers email, text messages, work, and a host of other distractions. After some experimenting, I found a method that works for me: I tune into the livestream while sitting, but keep my laptop out of sight. That way, the kyosaku’s whack and dokusan bell provide the familiar soundtrack of sesshin without the seductive glow of the LED screen.

Other lay practitioners have found their own ways of balancing digital engagement with solitary practice:

Shea Settimi says, “I’ve learned that I have to get really quiet and grounded before I ‘enter’ the day. I do stretching, liturgy, sitting, tarot practice and journaling. And then I open it up. I’m blessed to have a very large and amazing circle of friends, but talking/texting all day with others can be exhausting. I’m still learning to find the balance. I’ve also begun evening rituals to plant intentional seeds in my mind before going to bed. In a time like this where there is so much uncertainty and so little that I can control, the power of my mind feels really magnified. Every choice is important because I can experience the effects so directly and immediately.”

Seigei’s backyard zendo/painting studio

Seigei Spark set up a new home zendo in her painting studio. She spoke to me about the challenge of doing zazen in front of the computer, noting that the “checking mind”, which is pulled to texts, emails, or the news, is hard to let go of when the device is within arm’s reach. Although Seigei mostly does her zazen practice off-line, she expressed gratitude for the extensions of zendo liturgy into the home sphere that the livestream enables.

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Cabin Quarantine Hermitage

· Sangha News, Zen Training

By Taikyo Gilman

I’m sitting outside the Sangha House on day nine of quarantine away from other residents and monastics (I get wifi here), and its a bright, drizzly spring day. A friend down with Covid-19 after we visited—maintaining appropriate distance—and so protecting the other 35 residential sangha members, including our monastic teachers, is a huge priority. So just in case (I feel fine, so far so good), I am practicing solo. The escalation of new cases in New York this week has us all on edge.

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Cloister Living in the ‘New Normal’ at ZMM

· Sangha News, Zen Training

The garden is always a refuge but especially now—the delights of the greenhouse and the fresh earth outside are intoxicating—spring has truly come. In the “new normal” at the Monastery and the Temple, life continues with adjustments great and small. Here are some highlights from our new precautions and practices as the reality of social distancing in a communal monastic cloister comes home to us.

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Excerpt: Creative Process as Art Practice

· Creative Expression, Mountains & RIvers: Zen Dharma and Practice journal, Sangha News, Zen Training

This excerpt is from Mountains and Rivers, the annual book-length journal of the MRO which features original contributions from dharma teachers like Hojin Sensei, an artist, ceramicist and director of training at Zen Mountain Monastery. Learn more here about the journal and enjoy this teaching Hojin offered on creativity, connection and spiritual integrity.

Hojin Sensei: You can do an entire art practice with your eyes closed, so it’s not about technique. It’s about connections, about staying connected, turning off those voices that judge. Or, let the judge do your work! What does ‘judging my work’ actually look like? What would a judge draw? I mean, give ‘em a pen! Say “go to it, judge,” you know. They’d probably be, like, “naw, not that. You’re going to do that? no way, that doesn’t look like art.”

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Update: Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic

· Sangha News, Zen Training · , ,

Like many communities around the world, at both Zen Mountain Monastery and the Zen Center of NYC we are concerned about the spread of Coronavirus COVID-19 and are monitoring the unfolding events related to the virus.

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From Mountains & Rivers: Zen Dharma and Practice

· Beyond Fear of Differences, Dharma Discourses, Mountains & RIvers: Zen Dharma and Practice journal, Sangha News, Teachings

This excerpt, Manifesting Buddha by Geoffrey Shugen Arnold, is from the new journal Mountains & Rivers: Zen Dharma and Practice and explores how Buddhist practice manifests in our daily lives as illustrated by the Ten Guiding Values of the Beyond Fear of Differences. The journal features original contributions of dharma teachings and more from MRO dharma teachers, sangha artists and practitioners.

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Spring Ango 2020

· Sangha News, Zen Training · , , , ,

by Jeffrey Gyokudo Roberts

Even though the Catskills are frozen and quiet right now, if I close my
eyes, I can already hear the returning song of the Hermit Thrush and
smell the tulips blooming.  Slowly the Esopus Creek, covered in ice,
will loosen its grip on Winter and Spring will come.

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BFoD presentation March 2019

Delving into “What is Whiteness?”

· Beyond Fear of Differences, Sangha News, Zen Training

by Eve Romm

The first two meetings of the ZMM sangha’s new “What is Whiteness?” (WIW) group began the same way: enlarging the circle of chairs in the Sangha House to accommodate far larger numbers than expected. The overwhelmingly high attendance on Sunday afternoons didn’t come as a surprise. Since the BFOD forum last March which invited the larger sangha into the anti-racism work—which smaller planning groups have been engaged in for a decade—many white sangha members have expressed different versions of the same sentiment: “When can we start?”

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Earth Initiative Winter Update

· Earth Initiative, Sangha News

Upstate sangha traveled to Albany on Monday, January 28, to join forces in urging New York state legislators to fully fund the CLCPA (Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act) so it can fulfill its far reaching mandate to bring NYS’s carbon production and usage down to zero. Ten sangha members joined with hundreds from all over the state organized by NY Renews to visit with legislators and to rally at the legislative hearing on funding the CLCPA.

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