Articles & Essays

Photo By Bill Kando Johnston, MRO

Why Do Beings Live in Hate?

· Articles & Essays · ,

by The Buddha


 

Sakka, ruler of the devas, asked the Blessed One: “Beings wish to live without hate, hostility, or enmity; they wish to live in peace. Yet they live in hate, harming one another, hostile, and as enemies. By what fetters are they bound, sir, that they live in such a way?”

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Taking the Leap

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by Pema Chodron


 

Nothing is static and permanent. And that includes you and me. We know this about cars and carpets, new shirts and DVD players, but are less willing to face it when it comes to ourselves or to other people. We have a very solid view of ourselves, and also very fixed views about others. Yet if we look closely, we can see that we aren’t even slightly fixed. In fact, we are as unfixed and changing as a river. For convenience, we label a constant flow of water the Mississippi or the Nile, very much the way we call ourselves Jack or Helen. But that river isn’t the same for even a fraction of a second. People are equally in flux—I am like that, and so are you. Our thoughts, emotions, molecules are continually changing.

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Towards A Science of Consciousness

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by His Holiness The 14th Dalai Lama


While the Buddhist contemplative tradition has not had access to scientific means of gaining insight into the brain processes, it has an acute understanding of the mind’s capacity for transformation and adaptation. Until recently, I gather, scientists believed that after adolescence the hardware of the human brain becomes relatively unchangeable.

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Nothing Personal

· Articles & Essays · ,

by James Baldwin


The light that’s in your eyes,
Reminds me of the skies,
That shine above us every day.

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View

· Articles & Essays · ,

by Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche


When practicing meditation, we should become accustomed to the meaning of the view. Where is this view? At the moment our deluded mind probably is not in possession of the view. The unerring ultimate view is not something far away and spectacular that we need to look for outside, like embarking in a boat across the ocean after one has already exhausted all the land on Jambudvipa. That would be the approach of the causal vehicle of characteristics. When recognized within our present state of delusion, the view is naturally in the state of primordially pure great emptiness.

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The Perception of Sages

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by Zen Master Xiatang


To learn to be a Buddha, first you should break through the seeds of habit with great determination, and then be aware of cause and effect so that you fear to do wrong. Transcend all mental objects, stop all rumination. Don’t let either good or bad thoughts enter into your thinking, forget about both Buddhism and things of the world. Let go of body and mind, like letting go over a cliff. Be like space, not producing subjective thoughts of life and death, or any signs of discrimination. If you have any views at all, cut them right off and don’t let them continue.

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The Reality of Mind

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by Zen Master Hsuan-Sha


The earth and the sky are entirely composed of mind, but how do you explain the principle of being composed of mind? And how do you explain the reality of mind without form pervading the ten directions? There is no part that does not come from compassion producing knowledge, there is no part that does not come from knowledge activating compassion, and there is no part that does not come from compassion and knowledge equally illumining the ocean of essential nature, pervading the universe, completely fluid and free.

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Buddha Flowers, Leaves, Roots, and Dusts

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by Zen Master Hongzhi


Contemplating your own authentic form is how to contemplate Buddha. If you can experience yourself without distractions, simply surpass partiality and go beyond conceptualizing. All buddhas and all minds reach the essential without duality. Patch-robed monks silently wander and tranquilly dwell in the empty spirit, wondrously penetrating, just as the supreme emptiness permeates this dusty kalpa. Dignified without relying on others and radiant beyond doubt, maintaining this as primary, the energy turns around and transforms all estrangement. Passing through the world responding to situations,

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Fundamentally Perfect

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By Jetsün Khandro Rinpoche

Our fundamental nature is intrinsic. No sane, intelligent human being is impeded from being in touch with this basic nature. There is no one standing between you and it, no one is appearing like a mara to perform dances of distraction. At any given moment, each one of you—even with no understanding of Buddhism—has the natural potential to realize you are completely and inseparably united with your intrinsic wisdom nature. You have never been separate from it for a moment. It is not a sometimes- there-sometimes-not quality or an adornment that’s been attached or added on to you.

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Practicing With Demons and Dragons

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By Hakuin Zenji

I went to the Shoin-ji and became a monk at the age of fourteen. Beginning that very same spring, I began serving as an attendant of Nyoka Roshi. During this period I read my way through Five Confucian Classics and studied the literary anthology Wen-hsuan from cover to cover. When I turned eighteen, I accompanied Kin Shuso to the city of Shimizu, where we were admitted to the assembly of monks at the Zenso-ji. In the course of one of the lectures there, the story of Yen-t’ou the Ferryman came up. Wanting to learn more about the life of this priest, I got hold of a copy of Praise of the True School, and Kin and I read through it on our own. I learned that Yen-t’ou had met a violent death at the hands of bandits.

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